3998 stories
·
3 followers

DIY Asset Allocation Weights: November 2016

1 Share

Do-It-Yourself tactical asset allocation weights are posted.

Create a free account here if you want to access the site directly. Sign in here if you already have a free account.

Exposure Highlights:

  • Full exposure to domestic equities.
  • No exposure to international equities.
  • Half exposure to REITs.
  • Full exposure to commodities.
  • No exposure to long-term bonds.

Learn more about our tactical asset allocation system here, or pick up a copy of our new book, DIY Financial Advisor.

***

Note: This site provides no information on our value investing ETFs or our momentum investing ETFs. Please refer to this site.

*** ***

Join thousands of other readers and subscribe to our blog.

***

Please remember that past performance is not an indicator of future results. Please read our full disclaimer. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Alpha Architect, its affiliates or its employees. This material has been provided to you solely for information and educational purposes and does not constitute an offer or solicitation of an offer or any advice or recommendation to purchase any securities or other financial instruments and may not be construed as such. The factual information set forth herein has been obtained or derived from sources believed by the author and Alpha Architect to be reliable but it is not necessarily all-inclusive and is not guaranteed as to its accuracy and is not to be regarded as a representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the information’s accuracy or completeness, nor should the attached information serve as the basis of any investment decision. No part of this material may be reproduced in any form, or referred to in any other publication, without express written permission from Alpha Architect.

The post DIY Asset Allocation Weights: November 2016 appeared first on Alpha Architect.

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Sounds Like Something Pretty Important Happened This Weekend

1 Share
I typically refuse to talk publicly about issues like Taiwan but based upon the sheer panic I’ve seen from so many DC journos and think tankers, I feel it is important to put some things down. The saying around here … Continue reading
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Exchange traded funds: Taking over the markets

1 Share
The products have transformed US bourses, but some worry that ETFs are breeding systemic risks
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

2016-095: Distributed ledger technology in payments, clearing, and

1 Share
David Mills, Kathy Wang, Brendan Malone, Anjana Ravi, Jeff Marquardt, Clinton Chen, Anton Badev, Timothy Brezinski, Linda Fahy, Kimberley Liao, Vanessa Kargenian, Max Ellithorpe, Wendy Ng, and Maria Baird | Digital innovations in finance, loosely known as fintech, have garnered a great deal of attention across the financial industry. Distributed ledger technology (DLT) is one such innovation that has been cited as a means of transforming payment, clearing, and settlement processes, including how funds are transferred and how securities, commodities, and derivatives are cleared and settled. An important goal of this paper is to examine how this technology might be used in the area of payments, clearing, and settlement and to identify both the opportunities and challenges facing its practical implementation and possible long-term adoption. DLT has the potential to provide new ways to transfer and record the ownership of digital assets; immutably and securely store information; provide for identity management; and other evolving operations through peer-to-peer networking, access to a distributed but common ledger among participants, and cryptography. Potential use cases in payments, clearing, and settlement include cross-border payments and the post-trade clearing and settlement of securities. These use cases could address operational and financial frictions around existing services. Nonetheless, the industry's understanding and application of this technology is still in its infancy, and stakeholders are taking a variety of approaches toward its development. Given the technology's early stage, a number of challenges to development and adoption remain, including in how issues around business cases, technological hurdles, legal considerations, and risk management considerations are addressed. To understand fast moving developments in this area, a team of Federal Reserve staff conducted a series of discussions with approximately 30 organizations, including financial institutions, financial market infrastructures, technology start-ups, established technology firms, and other government agencies.
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Secretary of state contender Jon Huntsman says Trump was 'absolutely right' to take Taiwan call

1 Share
Secretary of state contender Jon Huntsman says Trump was 'absolutely right' to take Taiwan call If he does the get the job, might this come back to haunt Huntsman? [ more › ]
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Almost all the jobs created since 2005 are temporary

1 Share
A car with Uber and Lyft stickers on it

The conventional full-time job is disappearing.

Survey research conducted by economists Lawrence Katz of Harvard University and Alan Krueger at Princeton University shows that from 2005 to 2015, the proportion of Americans workers engaged in what they refer to as “alternative work” jumped from 10.7% to 15.8%. Alternative work is characterized by being temporary or unsteady—such as work as an independent contractor or through a temporary help agency.

“We find that 94% of net job growth in the past decade was in the alternative work category,” said Krueger. “And over 60% was due to the [the rise] of independent contractors, freelancers and contract company workers.” In other words, nearly all of the 10 million jobs created between 2005 and 2015 were not traditional nine-to-five employment.

Krueger, a former chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, was surprised by the finding. The survey’s original goal was to quantify the size of the gig economy (0.5% and growing). The researchers were caught off guard by the tremendous growth of alternative work. There had been almost no change from 1995 to 2005.

Katz and Krueger found that each of the common types of alternative work increased from 2005 to 2015—with the largest changes in the number of independent contractors and workers provided by contract firms, such as janitors that work full-time at a particular office, but are paid by a janitorial services firm.

The decline of conventional full-time work has impacted every demographic. Whether this change is good or bad depends on what kinds of jobs people want. “Workers seeking full-time, steady work have lost,” said Krueger. “While many of those who value flexibility and have a spouse with a steady job have probably gained.”

For graphic designers and lawyers who hate going to an office, new technology and Obamacare has made it more appealing to become an independent contractor. But for those seeking a steady administrative assistant office job, the market is grim.

Women experienced an unusually large increase in the share of alternative work. They were three percentage points less likely than men to engage in alternative work in 2005, but two percentage points more likely in 2015. This is in large part because the sectors that saw the largest move towards alternative work arrangements—like education and medicine—have a high proportion of women.

The American work environment is rapidly changing. For better or worse, the days of the conventional full-time job may be numbered.



Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories